Cooking some meals from Ferran Adria’s new book, The Family Meal

March 19, 2012 at 3:03 pm Leave a comment

The hardest part of making dinner for the extended family (or even on a regular weeknight with just the 3 of us) is figuring out what to make.  Making meals is not at all difficult.  So, when I saw reviews for Ferran Adria’s new book, The Family Meal, I thought it would be fun to see what set meals he has.

~The beginning of the book describes ingredients and cooking techniques, as well as philosophy.  Clearly, getting everything ready makes things easier.  He also includes basic sauces that are used in many of the recipes.  (One short cut is to buy some of these pre-made.)

~In any case, as would be expected, when you’re cooking for extended family, there’s always food preferences to consider and dietary restrictions, not to mention Lent.  It’s nice to see all 31 meals laid out in a calendar form – You can easily choose things to mix & match meals.  Although the chef discusses side dishes in a small section, each the meal contains an appetizer, main, and dessert; each set has meat or fish.  So, if you’re vegetarian, this would not be the book for you.  Also, given our changes, I have definitely added sides of vegetables or salad to each of the meals I tried.

~What’s nice about the recipes is that each step is shown but you can get this type of cooking notes from looking at websites.  Still, it does give a benchmark.

Caesar Salad

#1:  For my first try, I combined the Caesar salad and Santiago cake from Meal 1 with the Pasta Bolognese from Meal 2.   Both the salad and the pasta were very good.

*

 

*For the pasta, I increased the quantities for the recipe to make it a main but not by much and it worked well.  

Rather than increasing all the meat, I added tempeh (steamed and separated) to the mix. The combination of meats in the pasta was perfect; the tempeh added texture but did not add a huge vegetable flavor. (Note that I’m only showing the sauce.)

*The biggest problem I had was with the Santiago cake.  The proportions for a regular pan size seem just off.  The first panel said to grease a 12×20” square pan but the amount of batter seems like too little for that size pan.  I tried a 9” spring form to start but ended up changing it to an 8” spring form.  Without having transferred, I think it would have ended up just a bit better with no altitude adjustment necessary.  The flavor was good and so might be worth trying again.

#2:  For try 2, I made the roasted vegetables and salmon stewed with lentils from Meal 29, and the chocolate cookies from Meal 2.  I made rolls to go with the meal because I thought it would be nice to have something to dip into the stew.  Since I didn’t have much time, I made quick cooking tapioca with coconut milk.

*The roasted vegetables were good but quite standard – nothing special. (I don’t like eggplant and so subbed zucchini.)

*The salmon stewed in lentils were delicious.  This dish required the sofrito and the picada sauces – both smelled and tasted great.  They may have added to the dish’s flavor but also disappeared a bit into the sauce.  It was hard to tell that the extra work had gone into it.

Salmon with Lentils

*The chocolate cookies ended up OK but were again a problem.  The batter was too running to shape into anything.  I added just enough additional flour to get to hold.  As you can see, I rolled and put into a paper towel roll to keep in a circular shape.  However, when I took them out, even after the long freezer stay, they were so soft that I ended up scooping.  If I were to make these again, I would add a lot more flour (and maybe some cocoa to keep the chocolate intensity).  On the other hand, one could just add a bit more flour, as I did above, and then just scoop onto the pans…quite good made in this way, too.

#3:  For try 3, I made the cheeseburger from Meal 1, and the coconut  macaroons from Meal 6.  I served this with a focaccia, details below.

*The cheeseburger mixture is reminiscent of a meat loaf mixture.  The added ingredients help to make the burger stay moister.

*The focaccia I made came from Nancy Silverton that you can find on the Los Angeles Times website ( Nancy Silverton’s foccacia.)  Because I was using this recipe with the cheese burgers, I kept the top simple with fresh thyme and a drizzle of olive oil on the top and baked as described in the topping recipes.  It was delicious.

*I made the macaroons with the regular sugared coconut shreds from the regular grocery store.  So, I reduced the sugar by a half (and could probably reduce it more).  It turned out perfectly.  As a gluten free treat, it’s also incredibly useful to have in the arsenal.

*I served the macaroons along side some tapioca pudding.  Just to let you know, I’ve been very excited about cooking with small pearl tapioca – as opposed to quick cooking.  While it does take a significantly longer time to cook, the texture is unique and completely worth it.

#4:  For the try 4, I made the roasted chicken and pineapple dessert from Meal 22, and the Tagliatelle carbonara from Meal 2.

*I followed the directions for the chicken as directed, with the chicken placed breast-side down first and then flipped over.  This seemed a bit unnecessary and the top seemed a little flat out of the oven.  However, since I served the pieces sliced on a platter, no one saw the top but me.  (Note that I used a roasting thermometer that lets you set an ending temperature.)  The chicken was juicy and delicious.

*The carbonara is interesting because it’s not exactly like an Italian carbonara but does have some similarities.  I think it relies less on the cheese than on just pure fat.  In the recipe, the bacon is fried and then cream is added.  This is cooked for 20 minutes (which flavors the cream).  If I were making this dish again, I would drain the bacon and then cook the bacon and cream together.  This wouldn’t diminish the amount of fat in the dish by a whole lot and make it just slightly healthier.  I made the recipe for 6 servings but used only 4 yolks.  This was just fine and also reduced some of the fat.  Note that to make the dish even healthier, I really lightly blanched some asparagus to add.  With the pieces of bacon and asparagus, it was so pretty.

*I decided to use honey in place of the molasses for the pineapple dessert.  I also baked the pineapple a little in the oven before cutting into serving slices and continuing with the recipe. I warmed the honey in the microwave and then zested the lime on top.  It was great.

~What do I think?  Nice, instructive, flexible…  Heavy on the protein — The combinations could use more added vegetables.  One could skip the appetizer and add that extra vegetable or add vegetables into the various dishes (as I did with the carbonara dish.

*The dishes with protein work really well.  They work true to the recipe and require a little less intuition.  The baked goods needed a little more cooking by feel in order to make work.  (The pineapple dish obviously didn’t require any adjustments but it’s more of a “way to serve” rather than a recipe.)  I would try some of them again but might research to check proportions before starting.

*Note that the quantitites are a bit large and so you can easily adjust the appetizer recipes up by a little to make them into the main and the main could be adjusted down a little to make normal portion sizes.  (Portion size is extremely important.  You can eat a little bit fattier or “bad for you” things, if you keep the portion sizes reasonable.)

~Would I do any of these menus again?  Well, loosely speaking, I would.  Actually, I didn’t do a single one of the menus as laid out – instead I mixed and matched.  This was easy to do because everything was presented so nicely in the calendar form.

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Entry filed under: Baked goodies, cake, chocolate, Cookbooks, cookies, Food, Noodles. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , .

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